German NumbersHow To Count From 1 To 100

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Now that we've covered some important grammar lessons, let's focus on building up your vocabulary with some important, practical words: the German numbers!

Learning how to count in German is pretty straight forward and logical. Once you've memorised the first ten numbers, the rest is pretty predictable, and uncomplicated to grasp. Let's start.

German Numbers (Basics)

Numbers 1 - 10

Let's start by learning the absolute basics: how to count from 1 - 10 in German!

Although German numbers often sound similar to their English translations, they are not exactly the same:

eins
one (1)
zwei
two (2)
drei
three (3)
vier
four (4)
fünf
five (5)
sechs
six (6)
sieben
seven (7)
acht
eight (8)
neun
nine (9)
zehn
ten (10)

Listen closely to the pronunciation, and repeat the words out loud to yourself. Take a close look at the spelling.

You will need to memorise these words, as they will be the building blocks you'll be able to use, in order to construct larger numbers intuitively, in German.

Good job! 🎉

You're over the biggest hurdle. Let's continue, with numbers 11 - 20.

Numbers 11 - 20

This next set of numbers is notable, because the numbers 11 and 12 are unique, just as the numbers 1 - 10 are. You will need to simply memorise them.

However, from number 13 onwards, you'll notice a pattern and recognise the numbers you just learned above:

elf
eleven (11)
zwölf
twelve (12)
dreizehn
thirteen (13)
vierzehn
fourteen (14)
fünfzehn
fifteen (15)
sechszehn
sixteen (16)
siebzehn
seventeen (17)
achtzehn
eightteen (18)
neunzehn
nineteen (19)
zwanzig
twenty (20)

Numbers 21 - 30

Up until number 20, the numbers in German are arguably quite similar to their English translations: ten = zehn. fifteen = fünfzehn.

However, from number 20 onwards, things get a little trickier.

For example, in English, the number 25 would be spelled: twenty-five. In German, it's spelled: fünfundzwanzig. (five and twenty)

Most of the numbers in German will continue using this pattern:

einundzwanzig
twenty-one (21)
zweiundzwanzig
twenty-two (22)
dreiundzwanzig
twenty-three (23)
vierundzwanzig
twenty-four (24)
fünfundzwanzig
twenty-five (25)
sechsundzwanzig
twenty-six (26)
siebenundzwanzig
twenty-seven (27)
achtundzwanzig
twenty-eight (28)
neunundzwanzig
twenty-nine (29)
dreißig
thirty (30)

Counting to 100

Let's now count to 100 in German, in multiples of 10. From 20 - 90, the -ig suffix is used.

zehn
ten (10)
zwanzig
twenty (20)
dreißig
thirty (30)
vierzig
fourty (40)
fünfzig
fifty (50)
sechzig
sixty (60)
siebzig
seventy (70)
achtzig
eighty (80)
neunzig
ninety (90)
hundert
hundred (100)

German Number Exercises

Taking into account the patterns you have learned in this article, can you correctly say these numbers out loud, in German?

NumberGerman
34
47
88
91
65

Now try your hand at writing the numbers down, in this exercise:

NumberGerman
34
47
88
91
65

Large Numbers

Lastly, here are some other helpful, larger numbers to memorise.

eintausend
thousand
zweitausend
two-thousand
zehntausend
ten thousand
zwanzigtausend
twenty thousand
hunderttausend
one hundred thousand
die Million
million
die Millarde
billion
☝️Die Milliarde

Watch out for the tricky one: die Milliarde may sound like 'million', but in fact means 'billion'.

Well done! 🎉

You now have a working knowledge of the German numbers, and may use them in conversation!

Head over to our next lesson on German restaurant phrases, to learn how to make use of the German numbers, in everyday situations.